Monthly Archives: May 2012

  • Soccer Team Scores a Goal With Labeling Promotion

    The Los Angeles Galaxy soccer team has teamed up with Shasta Beverages for a new promotion that will feature the club on product packaging and labels.

    The promotional effort will also leverage SnapTags from SpyderLynk, which are quick response code-like graphics. When fans scan SnapTag images on the containers and labels, they will be able to access tips from the LA Galaxy that teach them how to perform tricks such as balancing soccer balls.

    Buyers will also be able to use the technology to upload videos of their own soccer tricks for other Galaxy fans to see. Whoever has the most popular video for that month will receive $1,000 and a six-month supply of Shasta.

    "Shasta is excited to use SnapTag technology on our packaging and materials to engage our consumers," said Abbey Glaser, director of brand management at Shasta Beverages. "Our Shasta Flavorstyle promotion powered by SnapTags gives fans an easy and immediate way to connect with us and bring to life the fun and flavor of the program."

    Beverage manufacturers frequently partner with popular celebrities, properties or other organizations to promote their goods. For example, Brisk recently teamed up with Star Wars to for a special labeling deal.

  • Canadian Government No Longer Weeding Out Bad Fertilizers

    As a way to save money, the Canadian federal government will no longer check fertilizers for false claims on labels Canada.com reports.

    In a prepared statement, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency — the arm of the government in charge of safety issues — informed the public it would no longer regulate fertilizer effectiveness. However, this only goes for pre-market efficacy assessments, which ensure label claims are backed by scientific evidence. The CFIA will still test products to ensure they are safe for the environment.

    "The system of science-based efficacy or guarantees has worked for a long time in Canada. CFIA believes that the existing system was working by and large, and did not see a need for drastic change. The government made a decision in the budget and we are working with the CFIA to make a smooth transition to a deregulated market," Roger Larson, president of the Canadian Fertilizer Institute, said.

    Critics suggest that consumers should carefully look at fertilizer labels to ensure they are using them properly. One Harvard researcher even said she would let her kids play in yards recently treated by fertilizers, provided the products were used correctly.

  • Private Label Production is Up in the UK

    U.K. businesses don't need big-name brands on their product labels to sell at grocery stores, according to a new Mintel study.

    The production of own-label and private products in the U.K. has never been higher. Private label production accounted for 54 percent of product development last year in the U.K., compared to 46 percent for known brands. This marks the first time this has ever happened, notes BizCommunity.

    "Today, some 57 percent of consumers think that own-label products have improved in taste and quality, while 52 percent actually prefer them to brands in some cases. Furthermore, some 82 percent of adults think that own-label products provide value for money, compared to just 16 percent for brands," the news source adds.

    In the United States, many consumers are steering away from branded products as a way of saving money. According to Acosta Sales & Marketing, 53 percent of Americans are paying more attention to what they buy at the grocery store and are trying to spend less.

  • Check the Tag Twice: New Products Boast Sunscreen-Like Capabilities

    With Memorial Day now behind us, many Americans are gearing up for the warmer summer months.

    So are several product manufacturers, with some brands rolling out unconventional products that boast sunscreen-like capabilities. For example, if consumers were to check the label of a specific brand of Uniqlo cardigans, they may see claims the apparel can block ultraviolet light. TRESemme's Climate Control shampoo similarly uses a UV-blocking chemical agent, The New York Times reports.

    Critics remain unconvinced that clothes, shampoos and other products with sunblocking chemicals could actually have much of an effect on consumers.

    "Our recommendation is that you stick to clothes with tighter weave and that will provide adequate UPF protection," David Andrews, a senior researcher with the Environmental Working Group, told the news source. "Not to mention there's no need to do a full load of wash with all your undergarments and everything to make them UPF protected."

    Producers of sunscreen will need to change the labels of their products as well. Newly passed legislation suggests they can no longer say their goods are "sunblock" or "water-proof" because these terms could be misleading.

  • WTO Looks To Change International Product Labeling

    Many American companies are quick to flaunt their national heritage with a "Made in the U.S.A" label positioned prominently on packaging.

    However, a new initiative from the World Trade Organization may put that practice to an end, The Huffington Post reports. The WTO argues that as more companies have diversified their supply chains, it has become increasingly difficult to claim a product was made in one country when it was likely assembled — at least partially — in a number of different regions.

    The WTO suggests country-specific origin labels should be discarded in favor of "Made in the World" labels, a change that many observers are worried would provide consumers with inaccurate information on the goods they'd like to buy.

    "For consumers, 'Made in the World' labels wouldn't allow you to protect your family from the tainted, harmful, and even life-threatening products coming from China," Alan Uke, founder of Underwater Kinetics, writes for the news source. "You wouldn't be able to support saving and creating jobs for other Americans by buying 'Made in U.S.A.'"

    Some brands have noted that country-of-origin labels provide a sales boost in foreign countries. For example, ABC News recently reported that Chinese consumers are specifically seeking out American products.

  • Labeling Lawsuits Lead to Odd Warnings

    Manufacturers are increasingly being taken to court by consumers who claim their product labels are misleading or don't convey the full picture.

    This has changed how many companies view their product labels and is encouraging many to adopt the mindset of being better safe than sorry. It isn't outlandish to see absurd warnings on labels to protect the manufacturer from future lawsuits, book author Bob Dorigo Jones explains.

    For example, an electric skillet that Jones recently saw had the obvious warning "Caution: Griddle surface may be hot during and after cooking." An electric razor featured this advice on the label: "Never use while sleeping."

    On the other hand, these warnings may also act as a deterrent for some buyers. A warning about fire risks from a heat pad could encourage consumers to purchase a competitor's product instead. It's a catch-22 situation, where both companies and consumers have issues striking a balance.

    "We've been tracking a growing trend this year - changes in consumer behavior as a result of scary labels," says Jones.

  • Lawsuit Aims to Get the Wrinkles Out of P&G Marketing

    Procter & Gamble's Olay Regenerist brand is at the center of a lawsuit, with a California woman taking the brand to court for false claims made on labels and advertisements.

    San Joaquin County resident lorette Perez-Pirio claims that Olay Anti-Aging Eye Roller and Regenerating Eye Cream misrepresent the impact and benefits of the products. According to advertisements and product labels, the makeup is supposed to reduce puffiness, dark circles, fine lines and wrinkles, The Los Angeles Times reports.

    "In an effort to capitalize on this growing and robust market, manufacturers routinely make far-fetched claims about the benefits of a product," the suit claims, accusing many companies of being "snake oil salesmen."

    The class action lawsuit represents additional women who have purchased the products in recent years as well.

    The makeup industry has few regulations, and it isn't uncommon to see misleading claims appear on products or for ingredients not to be disclosed. This has gotten several cosmetics brands in trouble when people use products that contain allergens, such as gluten.

  • Unfamiliar Territory: Why Consumers Should Look Twice At Labels

    Food allergens are a serious threat to many consumers. Moreover, there are a tremendous number of ingredients that could potentially cause a reaction.

    As Bizcommunity notes, consumers need to check product labels twice before eating anything. While most brands are good at noting ingredients that could potentially cause a reactions, there could also be "hidden allergens" that may not go by a common name yet, still trigger sickness.

    "Read each ingredient on the label, paying special attention to bold-faced items, parentheses and items listed below the complete list of ingredients," the news source warns. "For processed foods (anything that is made from more than one ingredient), check the label for a warning that the food was made in a factory where your allergens may have been used on the same manufacturing lines."

    Food makers should also do their part to make it transparent what ingredients were used in the creation of their goods. This will help mitigate any potentially costly product recalls.

  • Aussie Alcohol Industry Fights Against Pregnancy Labels

    It's a well-known fact that pregnant mothers shouldn't drink alcohol or their children could be born with a number of related birth defects.

    However, Australian alcohol companies say these claims are bent out of proportion and are scaring away potential buyers with warning labels on bottles and containers. Several members of the alcohol industry have submitted inquiries to the House of Representatives saying that such labels can result in "scaremongering," citing research that suggests fetal alcohol syndrome has been exaggerated.

    The Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education has refuted these claims and suggests the sector is trying to boost its bottom line by rallying against these labels, Casey Weekly Berwick reports.

    "'The alcohol industry wishes to propagate the myth that it is somehow risky to ensure consumers are appropriately informed of the potential harms from its product,'' Michael Thorn, chief executive of the foundation, told the news source.

    For product manufacturers, full disclosure on labels is often the best policy. This helps avoid any lawsuits and bolsters customers' faith in a brand.

  • Water Bottles May Need to Recycle Labels For More Effective Ones

    Bottled-water companies may have to go back to the drawing board and design clearer labels, new data from Perception Research Services International suggests.

    Recycling messages featured on overwraps for 24-pack cases went unnoticed by 70 percent of shoppers, and the ones who did observe them said they didn't resonate well, Plastics News reports. This is a warning sign that water companies need to reevaluate the size, placement and content of their recycling messages.

    "It seems to be a missed opportunity," said PRSI's Jonathan Asher at the Bioplastek conference in Arlington, Virginia, earlier this year, as quoted by the news source. "If you need to have a meaningful message to convey, you need to think about how to convey it. As a brand owner, you have to decide what's most important and change what you put on [the] front."

    For many consumers, purchase decisions are made within seconds. If a label isn't clearly broadcasting features such as being made out of recycled plastic, these perks are likely to go completely unnoticed.

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Material Descriptions

Materials

BIOSTONE

One of our eco-friendly options that is actually made of stone—no trees are used. This material should not laminated.

CAST GLOSS

This is another material specially designed for the wine industry. It is paper-based with a high-gloss white finish. Same adhesive and liner as Estate #9.

CHROME (SILVER) BOPP

This material has the same water and oil-resistant properties as our White BOPP and Clear BOPP, but has the "mirror-like" look of shiny chrome.

CLASSIC CREST

Best suited for wine labels, this is a white paper stock with a dull matte finish. It is not suitable for lamination and is therefore not waterproof. Same adhesive and liner as Estate #9.

CLEAR BOPP

This is the clear version of the Polypropylene (BOPP) material. It has the same waterproof qualities as the White BOPP. It provides more of a "no label" look and is also suitable for window stickers (where reverse printing of the image allows the label to be applied to the inside of a glass window and be viewed from the outside).

ESTATE #9

This is a great option for wine labels, gourmet foods or applications where a textured finish is desired. Being a paper stock, it's not as water-resistant or durable as BOPP, but its light cream color and textured feel add a touch of the "unusual" to the right product. It features a special adhesive (removable in 100+ degree hot water) and a stronger liner particularly suited to machine application. Not suitable for lamination.

GOLD POLYESTER (METALIZED)

This material will make your labels shine! Suitable for most labeling applications, it has a strong adhesive backing and must be laminated. Choose glossy laminate to make your label designs pop, or matte for a unique, elegant look.

KRAFT (RECYCLED)

This is a recycled 100% post consumer waste material. It is a 55# paper material that is a wonderful option if an “earthy” appearance is desired. The stronger liner is well suited for machine application. Depending upon face, substrate, water temperature and dwell time, label may be removed in hot water. It is not suitable for lamination; therefore, it is not water or oil resistant.

REMOVABLE WHITE BOPP

This material is the same as our standard BOPP, but has a special, "less aggressive" adhesive designed to allow the label to be removed or re-positioned after application. Depending on the surface it will be applied to, customer testing is strongly recommended. We can provide samples for this purpose.

SATIN CLOTH

Quite the unique material! Yes, it is woven satin acetate cloth. Think wine or spirit labels! This material will make your product packaging POP. The stronger liner is well suited for machine application. Depending upon face, substrate, water temperature and dwell time, label may be removed in hot water.

SQUEEZABLE

A white, 3mil film that is better suited for squeezable applications. This material has proven to work well in a variety of applications, so you can be confident it will perform well for you.

VELLUM (RECYCLED)

A great “green” choice, this 60# vellum is 100% recycled with 100% post consumer waste material. Cannot be laminated. Is neither water nor oil-resistant. The stronger liner is well suited for machine application. Depending upon face, substrate, water temperature and dwell time, label may be removed in hot water.

WHITE BOPP

This is our most commonly used material and is suitable for most applications. It's a polypropylene material with a permanent adhesive. It is impervious to water and oils, and is particularly suitable for bath and body products, as well as food containers.

WHITE EARTHFIRST PLA

A more environmentally friendly alternative to White BOPP. The PLA stands for Polylactic Acid (a biopolymer made from corn rather than petrochemicals). Similar look and feel to BOPP and suitable for most applications, but should not be used directly on candle containers.

WHITE FLEXIBLE VINYL

This is our most substantial material. The vinyl is thicker than BOPP, and is most suitable for outdoor applications where greater strength and durability are needed, or where lengthy exposure to the elements is an issue.

WINDOW DECAL (CLEAR/ULTRA-REMOVABLE)

We offer this window decal option as an alternative to static cling. The face stock is clear with excellent clarity. The adhesive is an ultra-removable featuring excellent weatherability and UV resistance. It removes cleanly from a wide variety of substrates without staining or ghosting. Why worry about static clings staying on when you can have removable adhesive there to hold it in place?

CAST GLOSS

This is another material specially designed for the wine industry. It is paper-based with a high-gloss white finish. Same adhesive and liner as Estate #9.

CHROME (SILVER) BOPP

This material has the same water and oil-resistant properties as our White BOPP and Clear BOPP, but has the "mirror-like" look of shiny chrome.

CLASSIC CREST

Best suited for wine labels, this is a white paper stock with a dull matte finish. It is not suitable for lamination and is therefore not waterproof. Same adhesive and liner as Estate #9.

CLEAR BOPP

This is the clear version of the Polypropylene (BOPP) material. It has the same waterproof qualities as the White BOPP. It provides more of a "no label" look and is also suitable for window stickers (where reverse printing of the image allows the label to be applied to the inside of a glass window and be viewed from the outside).

ESTATE #9

This is a great option for wine labels, gourmet foods or applications where a textured finish is desired. Being a paper stock, it's not as water-resistant or durable as BOPP, but its light cream color and textured feel add a touch of the "unusual" to the right product. It features a special adhesive (removable in 100+ degree hot water) and a stronger liner particularly suited to machine application. Not suitable for lamination.

GOLD POLYESTER (METALIZED)

This material will make your labels shine! Suitable for most labeling applications, it has a strong adhesive backing and must be laminated. Choose glossy laminate to make your label designs pop, or matte for a unique, elegant look.

KRAFT (RECYCLED)

This is a recycled 100% post consumer waste material. It is a 55# paper material that is a wonderful option if an “earthy” appearance is desired. The stronger liner is well suited for machine application. Depending upon face, substrate, water temperature and dwell time, label may be removed in hot water. It is not suitable for lamination; therefore, it is not water or oil resistant.

REMOVABLE WHITE BOPP

This material is the same as our standard BOPP, but has a special, "less aggressive" adhesive designed to allow the label to be removed or re-positioned after application. Depending on the surface it will be applied to, customer testing is strongly recommended. We can provide samples for this purpose.

SATIN CLOTH

Quite the unique material! Yes, it is woven satin acetate cloth. Think wine or spirit labels! This material will make your product packaging POP. The stronger liner is well suited for machine application. Depending upon face, substrate, water temperature and dwell time, label may be removed in hot water.

SQUEEZABLE

A white, 3mil film that is better suited for squeezable applications. This material has proven to work well in a variety of applications, so you can be confident it will perform well for you.

VELLUM (RECYCLED)

A great “green” choice, this 60# vellum is 100% recycled with 100% post consumer waste material. Cannot be laminated. Is neither water nor oil-resistant. The stronger liner is well suited for machine application. Depending upon face, substrate, water temperature and dwell time, label may be removed in hot water.

WHITE BOPP

This is our most commonly used material and is suitable for most applications. It's a polypropylene material with a permanent adhesive. It is impervious to water and oils, and is particularly suitable for bath and body products, as well as food containers.

WHITE EARTHFIRST PLA

A more environmentally friendly alternative to White BOPP. The PLA stands for Polylactic Acid (a biopolymer made from corn rather than petrochemicals). Similar look and feel to BOPP and suitable for most applications, but should not be used directly on candle containers.

WHITE FLEXIBLE VINYL

This is our most substantial material. The vinyl is thicker than BOPP, and is most suitable for outdoor applications where greater strength and durability are needed, or where lengthy exposure to the elements is an issue.

WINDOW DECAL (CLEAR/ULTRA-REMOVABLE)

We offer this window decal option as an alternative to static cling. The face stock is clear with excellent clarity. The adhesive is an ultra-removable featuring excellent weatherability and UV resistance. It removes cleanly from a wide variety of substrates without staining or ghosting. Why worry about static clings staying on when you can have removable adhesive there to hold it in place?

Artwork Specifications

Laminates

High Gloss

High gloss is our most popular laminate. It is the least expensive option and provides protection for the label and a high gloss shiny finish.

Matte

The Matte Laminate provides your label with a dull, non-glossy finish. Some customers consider this achieves a more "natural" look.

Thermal Transfer

This is a gloss laminate that is designed to work with most over-printing thermal transfer printers. We do recommend you get samples first to test through your own printer before placing an order with this laminate.

UV Outdoor Gloss

As the name implies this is best used for labels that will be used outdoors. It has a high gloss finish with excellent UV resistance. It is best paired with our vinyl material for the most durable outdoor label.