Warning Labels

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    Are Your Products Properly Labeled?

    When it comes to keeping kids safe, there's never a bad time. However, November is an especially apt month to ask whether brands and individuals are doing all they can. Child Safety and Protection Month is set aside to raise awareness of any places or things that may be putting kids in danger. If you own a brand that produces household items, how is your labeling strategy? Could new custom child safety labels increase the chances of parents and guardians using the products in the correct way? If so, it's time for a change: If your new approach protects even one child, it's been a success.

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  • Public Advertisements Featuring Sugary Beverages Will Soon Require a Warning
    As of July 25, makers of soda and similar sugary drinks will be required to include a warning on billboards and other types of publicly-displayed advertisements in San Francisco, The Wall Street Journal reported. Although companies in the industry attempted to have the court intervene, they were unsuccessful. This is the first city in the country to compel displays advertising sugar-added beverages to have a label warning of possible effects it could have on a person's health. 

    According to the source, the cautionary statement will read, "WARNING: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay.

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  • Promote Safety, Celebrate Bikers

    National Bike Month is this May, and acts as a time to celebrate the bicyclists of the United States and abroad. Companies that produce items such as bikes, helmets, pads and others will have a good opportunity to boost their brand image in the coming weeks by deploying a marketing campaign that promotes safety and commends bicyclists in unique and fashionable ways.

    If you produce these items, consider leveraging bike stickers to align your brand with National Bike Month itself, as this will be a relatively affordable and straightforward method of driving recognition, visibility and loyalty.

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    Growing Demand for More Honest Labels and Healthier Products

    There have been a lot of issues pertaining to health-related claims made on product labeling. Many consumers have argued that companies, thanks, in part, to loose regulation policies, are able to limit the amount of information they include on packaging to shoppers, which impacts their ability to make informed decisions. Some have said that the lack of transparency is resulting in people purchasing products that actually have the opposite effect of what they hope for when they buy them. By urging companies and policymakers to improve their labeling laws and guidelines, people hope that they will be better educated and able to make smarter choices.

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  • Government is being asked to require health warning labels on sugary drinks.

    States Say Sugar Warnings Needed for Consumer Health

    Amidst the growing controversy of fair food and product labeling practices, policymakers are getting another push to update regulations and guidelines, only this time it's not from confused consumers or advocacy groups; it's from scientists, doctors and dentists.

    The hot topic in question pertains to the negative impact sugar-sweetened drinks can have on health and whether or not such products should have a warning label. Bodies of nutritional science research have found a strong correlation between sugar intake and diseases such as type-2 diabetes and obesit

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  • Misinterpreting expiration labels could be contributing to food waste in America.

    Clarifying Expiration Labels May Reduce Food Waste Given the amount of food-related illness outbreaks this year, it's no surprise many consumers are especially cautious about checking the expiration dates listed on food labels.

    Most consumers are becoming more attentive to the foods they eat, not just because they fear food-borne sickness, but also because they want to lead a healthy life, which means purchasing "real," whole foods. However, usually these fresh vegetables and produce have shorter shelf-lives. If a consumer suspects a product has exceed its expiration date, naturally, he throws it away

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  • Capitalizing on Child Safety & Protection Month

    How Will Your Business Participate?

    November is Child Safety & Protection Month, which is an especially big event for the average product manufacturer who targets younger consumers. Although child safety labels are required on any objects that might present a risk to kids throughout the year, the observance of this awareness month will act as an opportunity for companies to go above and beyond the call of duty to gain more trust from their target markets.

    Because this observance also takes place in the busiest shopping month of the year, manufacturers and retailers will want to get moving on their child safety protection labels as soon as possible to get them out before Black Friday.

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  • Fire Awareness Week is 10/4 to 10/10

    The Importance of Fire Safety

    Fire Awareness Week runs from October 4 through October 10, and companies can ensure that they are observing this event properly by putting an extra effort into educating their employees and customers through engaging strategies. According to the National Fire Protection Association, billions of dollars are lost to fires in the United States annually, and the damages incurred relate back to a range of factors.

    The agency argued that $329 billion dollars in total losses were accrued in 2011 alone, and pointed out that this is more than 2 percent of gross domestic product in the United States.

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  • Undeclared Allergens Still a Leading Reason for Recalls
    If you took a random sample of recent food product recalls issued by the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service, chances are good that a significant percentage of them would pertain to undeclared allergens.

    The dangers of allergic reactions are well-documented, specifically those that occur in response to the eight major allergens: milk, eggs, fish, peanuts, shellfish, soy, tree nuts and wheat. In fact, the most extreme form of reaction, anaphylaxis, is described by the National Library of Medicine's Medical Encyclopedia as "severe" and "life-threatening.

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  • Tightening Up Toxicity Warning Standards for Stickers and Labels
    Often, issues pertaining to the content of product labels involve companies presenting their products in a falsely positive light. For example, businesses may fail to include important information such as the presence of allergens or inaccurately represent their products by making unsubstantiated claims - for instance, asserting that the items offer health benefits that haven't been proven. Recently, however, a California assemblyman set out to address a situation that has resulted in some companies unnecessarily branding their products as toxic - in other words, casting their wares in a negative light when they shouldn't actually have to.

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