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How Can Labels Convey Brand Message?

If designed effectively, branded labels should serve several purposes.Product Labels: A Central Part of Your Brand

When it comes down to it, there are two main reasons behind adding product labels to items - to help shoppers identify goods and to impart important information about ingredients. That being said, this is by no means labels' only use. In a sense, they act as mini billboards for a brand, whether they're wrapped around beer and wine bottles, emblazoned across nutraceutical product packaging or stuck on bars of soap. Beginning to think of stickers and labels as a promotional tool as well as a way to get across details of what products contain can change the entire perspective of a company. If leveraged effectively, packaging can become an extension of a brand in its own right. If a company fails to acknowledge and misses the chance to reinforce its brand message, however, a powerful marketing opportunity is lost.

The Dual Purposes of Custom Labels

At their core, custom labels serve two purposes, depending on the familiarity and stature of the brand.

  • A relatively unknown enterprise that's new, small or simply not well-known can use custom labels to make its products stand out from everything else on store shelves. Even businesses on a budget can benefit from Lightning Labels' good-quality, high-definition, vibrant labels.
  • For a more established brand, custom labels facilitate instant recognition for customers who either already know what they're looking for or are familiar with the company's good reputation and decide to give its products a try.

The Power of Branded Labels

If designed effectively, branded labels should answer the following two questions:

  • What attributes distinguish the company from its competitors, i.e. why should consumers choose this particular enterprise over any of the others that are out there?
  • How are the business' products different from - and better than - those offered by its rivals, i.e. what is their unique value and what makes them stand out from the crowd?

For instance, consider the example of an enterprise that has been around for more than a century. It makes sense for a company like this to focus its brand message around the general idea that it's been doing what it does for years and knows its industry better than any other organization out there. In this scenario, there's the implication that the business has gone through a process of trial and error, perfected its approach over time and, as a result, produces goods of a higher caliber than its younger and less seasoned competitors. The notion seems straightforward enough, but how can the company translate this to its labeling? Faux-parchment labels are a great way to emphasize age - and all without requiring the consumer to read a single word. That being said, of course, prominently displaying the year in which the enterprise was founded doesn't hurt either.